Categories

Categories

Account Navigation

Account Navigation

Currency - All prices are in AUD

Currency - All prices are in AUD
 Loading... Please wait...
The Bible House Inc

Categories

Categories

NLT PEW BIBLE - Case of 24

$359.76 $198.00
(You save $161.76)

NLT PEW BIBLE - Case of 24

$359.76 $198.00
(You save $161.76)
Weight:
40.00 LBS
Shipping:
Free Shipping
Quantity:
Share

Product Description

FREE SHIPPING  provided by Tyndale House Publishers 
 
 
DESCRIPTION
The NLT Pew Bible is a handsomely bound, durable hardcover Bible that is ideal for church use. The New Living Translation text is clear and understandable, making its use in sermons or public Scripture reading an impactful experience for congregations. Now available in black, burgundy or blue.
 
FEATURES
Translation and textual notes
Black Letter
8 pt text

SPECS
Blue ISBN-13:  9781414302027
Burgundy ISBN-13: 9781414302034
Black ISBN-13: 9781414389929
Binding:  Hardcover
Release Date:  October 2013
Page Count:  992
Type point size: 8
Size:  5.40" x 8.40" x 1.10"
Published by: Tyndale House
Tyndale List Price Each:  $14.99
Our Case Sale Price Each: $8.25
 

ABOUT THE NLT
English Bible translations tend to be governed by one of two general translation theories. The first theory has been called "formal-equivalence," "literal," or "word-for-word" translation. According to this theory, the translator attempts to render each word of the original language into English and seeks to preserve the original syntax and sentence structure as much as possible in translation. The second theory has been called "dynamic-equivalence," "functional-equivalence," or "thought-for-thought" translation. The goal of this translation theory is to produce in English the closest natural equivalent of the message expressed by the original- language text, both in meaning and in style.

Both of these translation theories have their strengths. A formal-equivalence translation preserves aspects of the original text--including ancient idioms, term consistency, and original-language syntax--that are valuable for scholars and professional study. It allows a reader to trace formal elements of the original-language text through the English translation. A dynamic-equivalence translation, on the other hand, focuses on translating the message of the original-language text. It ensures that the meaning of the text is readily apparent to the contemporary reader. This allows the message to come through with immediacy, without requiring the reader to struggle with foreign idioms and awkward syntax. It also facilitates serious study of the text's message and clarity in both devotional and public reading.

The pure application of either of these translation philosophies would create translations at opposite ends of the translation spectrum. But in reality, all translations contain a mixture of these two philosophies. A purely formal-equivalence translation would be unintelligible in English, and a purely dynamic-equivalence translation would risk being unfaithful to the original. That is why translations shaped by dynamic-equivalence theory are usually quite literal when the original text is relatively clear, and the translations shaped by formal- equivalence theory are sometimes quite dynamic when the original text is obscure.

The translators of the New Living Translation set out to render the message of the original texts of Scripture into clear, contemporary English. As they did so, they kept the concerns of both formal-equivalence and dynamic-equivalence in mind. On the one hand, they translated as simply and literally as possible when that approach yielded an accurate, clear, and natural English text. Many words and phrases were rendered literally and consistently into English, preserving essential literary and rhetorical devices, ancient metaphors, and word choices that give structure to the text and provide echoes of meaning from one passage to the next.

On the other hand, the NLT translators rendered the message more dynamically when the literal rendering was hard to understand, was misleading, or yielded archaic or foreign wording. They clarified difficult metaphors and terms to aid in the reader's understanding. The translators first struggled with the meaning of the words and phrases in the ancient context; then they rendered the message into clear, natural English. Their goal was to be both faithful to the ancient texts and eminently readable. The result is a translation that is both exegetically accurate and idiomatically powerful.

More than 90 Bible scholars, along with a group of accomplished English stylists, worked toward that goal. In the end, the NLT is the result of precise scholarship conveyed in living language.

Product Reviews

Find Similar Products by Category